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The image of the human hand encoded in DNA!

From the BBC

Researches chose the image of a human hand, representing the first form of human painting, to be the first DNA encoded image in a living form!
They inserted DNA sequences that represent the image into the genome of bacteria. Later, They decoded the sequences  into an image using a computer algorism with at least 90% accuracy.

The original DNA-coded image and the decoded image

Gloves Through History

Adapted from: Fashion Times

Gloves played a substantial role in the conduct of human affairs and social interactions beyond keeping one’s hands warm and protected since ancient societies. Early Egyptian Pyramids contained hand covers without fingers. The tomb of Tutankhamen had the remains of decorated gloves.

Falconry, from De Arte Venandi cum Avibus, (On The Art of Hunting with Birds) , 1240 AC

Leather gloves were popular in the 1100s. Sturdy leather gloves were worn by laborers, falconers, and knights, whereas fashion gloves were crafted of fine leathers such as doeskin and lamb. Scented gloves were developed in the 1500s. Chicken skin gloves were worn at night to keep hands soft and white. Fabric gloves crafted from silk, satin, velvet, cotton, and linen were stylish in the 1500s.

 

Gloves had a variety of symbolic uses. The delivery of a glove to a monarch at an inauguration ceremony symbolized recognition of the new authority. Nobles received a glove when knighted.  Bishop status was granted by the delivery of a glove as well.  On the same token, Knights conveyed defiance or launched a challenge by casting down their war-gloves (gauntlet).

Gloves were used as messages of good will between sovereigns and dignitaries. They were sent to wish a person well, to congratulate them, or to console them. Gloves were also used for binding a bargain or as a bribe.

Gloves were a token of love.  They served a knight as an everlasting reminder of his love, inducing him to courage, loyalty and constancy while away. It also served as a charm against evil during conflict.

Today, gloves are practical articles that warm and protect our hands. People continue the tradition of wearing gloves at funerals, weddings, state functions, formal events, and the opera,  as gloves maintain their symbolic value and fashion statements.

Haunted Arm Cast

My young patient had a happy surprise when she realized her cast was a glow-in-the-dark ‘ghost’ cast.

Harry Potter’s Brackium Emendo- healing broken bones in Witchcraft

Adapted from HarryPotterWikia

Harry Potter fans know very well that witchcraft can be dangerous.

Harry broke his ‘arm’ ( in reality, it was both-bone forearm fracture) during a Quidditch game and was ‘doctored’ by Professor Lockhart. The spell he used, Brackium Emendo, did not work as intended: instead of healing the bones, it made them disappear. Harry was then taken to the Hospital wing and treated with Skele-Gro, an awful tasting potion that grows missing bones.

 

I offer these few points to consider from an Orthopedic point of view:

This is a Sports injury! Should Quidditch players not wear protective ‘armor’?

Can this spell truly heal broken bones instantly?  No cast! No Surgery! No down time! I should go spend sometime at Hogwarts.

Oops. The spell did not work after all. On top, it had the unintended consequence of missing bones: a Complication.

The ‘Doctor’ did not explain the treatment ( the spell itself), its risks ( missing bones), other alternatives ( let it heal with a cast), and did not get consent for treatment. In fact, Potter did not want him to cast the spell! In our world, it is an easy law suit!

The ‘credentials’ of the ‘doctor’ were suspicious to start with. Was he Witchcraft-Certified? even better for the law suit.

Skele-Gro was used to reverse the complication. Where can I get one? Would it work on stubborn fractures ( nonunions) and missing bone fragments? Yet another reason to visit Hogwarts.

 

 

What it’s like to be a Hand Model

From the Big Great Story

Ever wondered who and how some people end up as  hand models?

This short video takes you behind the scenes and shares the experiences of three professional hand models.

 

On Fingerprints and What They Stand for

adapted from Wikipedia

Fingerprints are the detailed, unique, difficult to alter, impressions left by the friction ridges of fingers. Fingerprints are deposited on smooth surfaces by the natural secretions of sweat of the finger tips. Fingerprints are useful to confirm identity. They may be employed by police or other authorities to identify individuals who are incapacitated, deceased, or unable to identify themselves, such as young children or lost their memories. The ability to recover fingerprints and compare them, led to Fingerprint analysis, which has been in use since the early 20th century and has led to many crimes being solved. Today, many criminals wear gloves to avoid being caught. In 2015, fingerprint analysis was reported to be able to determine find the person’s gender.

Fingerprints have been found on ancient Babylonian artifacts, on the walls of Egyptian tombs, Greek, and Chinese pottery, as well as on bricks and tiles from ancient Babylon and Rome. Fingerprints were used as signatures in ancient Babylon,2000 BCE, and are still used in countries where some people do not know how to write and sign their names. who  in the second millennium BCE.

Fingerprints can also be a subject, or tools, of art. More than 320 students and staff at King Street Intermediate School in Danbury, Connecticut, fingerprinted themselves for fingerprint art installation for The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut. Artist Sandy Garnett has a whole fingerprint-themed art project.

One last point: patients with a  very rare medical condition, adermatoglyphia, have no fingerprints. The have completely smooth fingertips, palms, toes and soles, but no other related medical problems.

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