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WVU Medicine’s Dr. Shafic Sraj changing outlook for those with Dupuytren’s Disease

Featured on WVNews West Virginia

“MORGANTOWN — Folks suffering from Dupuytren’s contracture, or Dupuytren’s disease, once had a prognosis of complicated and invasive treatment options. But the work of Dr. Shafic Sraj at WVU Medicine is changing the outlook.

Dr Sraj has just completed a project on the disease, leading to more information about what people want to get out of their treatment and what they value the most. “We find that a lot of people actually have pain,” Sraj said. “Historically, we didn’t talk about this. This is something new.” A less invasive treatment is also something that Dr. Sraj and his WVU Medicine team are expert at. The surgeon just uses a tip of a needle that is inserted to “pop” the cord.

“I can take care of it immediately,” he said. “You’re done literally in seconds.

Avocado Hand

Avocado, the green-skinned, egg-shaped fruit, is getting more popular than ever. With it, there are increasing reports in media and medical news about avocado related  hand injuries .

 

Accidental knife injuries happen to fingers of the hand holding the avocado while peeling it. Such injuries has increased to the point that is they have been named ‘ Avocado hand’.

The hard shell covering a soft fruit allows the knife to slip through the flesh of the avocado and aim straight to ones fingers.  The best way to safely cut the avocado is not to hold it in your hand, but on a plate and aim the sharp edge of the knife away from your fingers. This can lead to serious injuries such as cut tendons, nerves, and blood vessels.

Ir Med J. The Avocado Hand. 2017 Dec 18;110(10):658.

Washing Your Hands

Adapted from BBC

Washing your hands- straightforward, or is it?

There’s plenty of evidence that washing one’s hands can reduce the spread of disease, only 5% of people wash their hands ‘properly’ ‘all the time’.

10% of 3000 people were witnessed leaving public toilets without washing their hands, and of those who did,33% didn’t use soap. While it is well established that we need to wash our hands properly, there are plenty of myths about what is proper.

Does the water need to be hot to get your hands clean?

In a survey of 500 adults, 69% believed that the temperature of the water has an impact on the effectiveness of hand-washing. Researchers found that water temperature made no statistically significant difference when other factors are controlled. Temperature still affects washing, though, because excessively cold or hot water lets people spend less time washing their hands than comfortable water temperature.

Is anti-bacterial hand wash better than soap?

A 2007 and a 2015 review both concluded that anti-bacterial hand washes  did not reduce the number of bacteria remaining on people’s hands after washing any more than soap did, nor was it any better than soap. Triclosan, a main ingredient on most antibacterial hand soaps, May increase anti-bacterial resistance and that and has been banned in the US and in the European Union.

Do you need to dry your hands afterwards?

Letting new hands air-dry is fine as long as he did not contaminated hands before they try out. Durkan’s transfer to your hands more easily if they’re wet.

Hand dryer or hand towel?

There’s a lot of debate surrounding this one. Most of us don’t want for as long as 45 minutes needed for the hands to dry using hand dry. New were hand dryers take 10 seconds hand and our equivalent to paper towels.

Making toilets nicer also makes a difference. One study observe 3,000 people in the US, found that if the toilets were clean and well-kept, people were more likely to stop and wash their hands properly. When the sinks were dirty, they just wanted to get out of there.

Whichever way you choose to wash and dry your hands, do it for longer than you think.

Pins and Needles

Adapted from BBC

Does it feel like pins and needles? (Credit: Science Photo Library)

Does it feel like pins and needles? (Credit: Science Photo Library)

Everyone has experienced that tingling sensation in the hands. It is commonly called “pins and needles” because it feels like tiny pointy needles. Some describe it as numb, or “falls asleep,” and is uncomfortable to place pressure on it.

The sensation itself is called “paresthesia,” or alternate sensation.

Sensation is transmitted from your body to your brain via nerves, your biological Internet cables. If you place too much pressure on one of them, the signal gets distorted. We call it Neuropathy, ie sick nerves. Once the pressure is relieved, it goes back online soon. If the pressure is not removed within reasonable time, it causes permanent change to the inner structure of the nerve and permanent change to the signal. More severe and long standing pressure can cause permanent loss of signal even. There are several nerves in the arm, and each may be subject to pressure at several spots. For more info, check the Numbness and Tingling page.

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