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AAOS’s Innovation Theater a Huge Success

I am very pleased to share that our first-time Innovation Theater has been a huge success. I am proud to be a member of the AAOS Exhibits Committee and the chairperson for the Innovation Theater Sub-committee.

Interview with WV Senator Stollings

WV Medical Journal Guest Editorial- July August 2017

http://digital.graphcompubs.com/publication/?m=30875&l=1#{“issue_id”:419834,”page”:20}

Gloves Through History

Adapted from: Fashion Times

Gloves played a substantial role in the conduct of human affairs and social interactions beyond keeping one’s hands warm and protected since ancient societies. Early Egyptian Pyramids contained hand covers without fingers. The tomb of Tutankhamen had the remains of decorated gloves.

Falconry, from De Arte Venandi cum Avibus, (On The Art of Hunting with Birds) , 1240 AC

Leather gloves were popular in the 1100s. Sturdy leather gloves were worn by laborers, falconers, and knights, whereas fashion gloves were crafted of fine leathers such as doeskin and lamb. Scented gloves were developed in the 1500s. Chicken skin gloves were worn at night to keep hands soft and white. Fabric gloves crafted from silk, satin, velvet, cotton, and linen were stylish in the 1500s.

 

Gloves had a variety of symbolic uses. The delivery of a glove to a monarch at an inauguration ceremony symbolized recognition of the new authority. Nobles received a glove when knighted.  Bishop status was granted by the delivery of a glove as well.  On the same token, Knights conveyed defiance or launched a challenge by casting down their war-gloves (gauntlet).

Gloves were used as messages of good will between sovereigns and dignitaries. They were sent to wish a person well, to congratulate them, or to console them. Gloves were also used for binding a bargain or as a bribe.

Gloves were a token of love.  They served a knight as an everlasting reminder of his love, inducing him to courage, loyalty and constancy while away. It also served as a charm against evil during conflict.

Today, gloves are practical articles that warm and protect our hands. People continue the tradition of wearing gloves at funerals, weddings, state functions, formal events, and the opera,  as gloves maintain their symbolic value and fashion statements.

Paper Cuts Hurt so Much

Adapted from BBC

Paper, seemingly completely harmless, can be a weapon in disguise: paper cuts hurt way beyond expectations.

It’s all to do with nerve endings. There are a lot more pain receptors in your fingertips than almost anywhere else in your body, which explains the intense fiery quality of finger paper cuts that are worse that than deeper cuts on the arm or the thigh. They don’t slice that deep into your body, which is perhaps why it’s puzzling that they should hurt so much. But it’s exactly for this reason that paper cuts hurt bad. A deeper wound would result in bleeding. The blood would clot and a scab would develop protecting it from the environment. The shallow wound of a paper cut doesn’t get the same cover, leaving the injured nerve endings exposed and more irritated.

Having said that, nobody has ever proven that this is the case, but it is a reasonable hypothesis. Don’t you agree?

Dream Land

​I just attended the feature presentation by author Sam Quinones at the WVSMA Healthcare Summit.

He describes how aggressive promotion of highly a addictive painkiller and the development of cheap underground heroin production, marketing, and delivery industry led to the current opioid epidemic.

The book won several awards including Amazon’s Best Nonfiction Book for 2015.

Wrist x-rays can predict a Child’s age

Adapted from Radiopaedia.org

Can you guess the bone age of this wrist x-ray?

Did you know that your kid’s wrist x-ray roughly matches his/her age?

The small bones of the wrist are called the carpal bones. They start out with no calcium at birth, and do not show on x-ray. They start building up calcium during the first three months of age in a process called Ossification. This occurs in a predictable manner and the bones ‘start appearing’ on x-ray in this order:

  • One bone:                 1-3 months
  • Two bones:               2-4 months
  • Three bones:            2-3 years
  • Four bones:              2-4 years
  • Five-seven bones:   4-6 years
  • Eight bones:             8-12 years

Next time you get an x-ray of your child’s wrist, count the ‘little round’ bones to find out the ‘bone age’.

Time to ossification, similar to height and weight of a growing child, can be highly variable and bone age X-rays are not obtained for  healthy children. A discrepancy between bone age and actual age is not a reason to worry unless there are concerns about the child’s growth.

 

What it’s like to be a Hand Model

From the Big Great Story

Ever wondered who and how some people end up as  hand models?

This short video takes you behind the scenes and shares the experiences of three professional hand models.

 

and the Winner is…

Adapted from ABC news

Anaya Ellick, 7, a first grader from Virginia, had such good handwriting that she won the national handwriting contest last week.

There was just one thing special about Anaya: She was born without hands….

On Fingerprints and What They Stand for

adapted from Wikipedia

Fingerprints are the detailed, unique, difficult to alter, impressions left by the friction ridges of fingers. Fingerprints are deposited on smooth surfaces by the natural secretions of sweat of the finger tips. Fingerprints are useful to confirm identity. They may be employed by police or other authorities to identify individuals who are incapacitated, deceased, or unable to identify themselves, such as young children or lost their memories. The ability to recover fingerprints and compare them, led to Fingerprint analysis, which has been in use since the early 20th century and has led to many crimes being solved. Today, many criminals wear gloves to avoid being caught. In 2015, fingerprint analysis was reported to be able to determine find the person’s gender.

Fingerprints have been found on ancient Babylonian artifacts, on the walls of Egyptian tombs, Greek, and Chinese pottery, as well as on bricks and tiles from ancient Babylon and Rome. Fingerprints were used as signatures in ancient Babylon,2000 BCE, and are still used in countries where some people do not know how to write and sign their names. who  in the second millennium BCE.

Fingerprints can also be a subject, or tools, of art. More than 320 students and staff at King Street Intermediate School in Danbury, Connecticut, fingerprinted themselves for fingerprint art installation for The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut. Artist Sandy Garnett has a whole fingerprint-themed art project.

One last point: patients with a  very rare medical condition, adermatoglyphia, have no fingerprints. The have completely smooth fingertips, palms, toes and soles, but no other related medical problems.

I know what distracts me. Do you?

April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons released its “No Small Distractions” videos  that highlight the importance of safety behind the wheel.

Distractions behind the wheel may not be as small as they seem.

Hospital Day at the Legislature 2016

The 2016 Hospital day at the Legislature was an opportunity to raise awareness to engage with the delegates, senators, and governor with regard to healthcare related matters. Several bills are under review with direct impact on hospitals and physicians. I had the chance to discuss and present input as a hospital advocate and a physician member of the WV State Medical Association.

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WV Governor, Earl Ray Tomblin

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Congress members Facemire, Romano, and Smith

Hand, X-Rays and, wait… Smuggling!

Adapted from NRP

I have heard many odd stories about medicine, but this one is different…

The Soviet Union state censorship was real strict in the 1950s, and foreign music records were difficult if not impossible to obtain in Russia. Some russians figured out a way to smuggle those records, by cutting grooves into used vinyl X-rays. This was recently discovered, and now there is a book written about it titled X Ray Audio.

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2015 WV State Medical Association Healthcare Summit

The West Virginia State Medical Association Health Summit at the  Greenbrier Resort was memorable! I learned that there is a lot more to caring for patients than treating them.

I look forward to participate next year.
Source: 2015HealthcareSummitPhotos

3D-printed prosthetic hand throws first pitch

From Sports Illustrated

Five-year-old girl, born with a hand birth defect, threw the first pitch for Baltimore Orioles using her 3D-printed prosthetic hand. The hand was designed and printed at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
Follow the link to watch the pitch!

Music and Surgery

Adapted from NRP

Music has always been suggested as a powerful tool to comfort patients recovery from surgery. The idea goes back to the days of Florence Nightingale. Music was used to ease surgical pain as early as 1914. Several studies have attempted to prove it, but those studies were small, and really didn’t find all that much.

Researchers in London started combing the medical literature for such studies and found hundreds of small studies suggesting some benefit. But once we put all the data together, they were able to find better evidence, that, yes indeed, surgery patients who listened to music, either before, during or after surgery, were reported less pain, less anxiety and more patient satisfaction.

On average, music helped the patients drop two points on the 10-point pain scale. That’s equal to pain relief reported with some pain medicines! And, unlike drugs,  music doesn’t seem to have side effects.

Titanium Rings

Adapted from NPR

Emergency room staff frequently have to remove rings and wedding bands of the fingers of patients when fingers swell up for any of several reasons. Finger swelling traps rings, which in return restrict blood flow, and cause even more swelling and pain. It not taken off in time, more severe blood flow restriction may lead to the loss of the finger- not fun.

Ordinarily, this wouldn’t be much of a problem. But… this was before Titanium rings became fashionable. Titanium rings are growing in popularity because they’re very strong, light, hypoallergenic and less expensive gold or platinum rings. But that strength makes them more difficult to remove, even with ring cutters. Sometimes bolt cutters have to be used as seen in this picture.

 

 

 

An apple a day does not keep the doctor away

Adapted from Becker’s Hospital Review.

The proverb “An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” dates back to the 1860s. (The Washington Post).

A recent study published in the April Fool’s issue of JAMA  found no significant difference regarding doctor’s visit between daily apple eaters compared to others.

Apple eaters were slightly more successful in avoiding prescription medications, suggesting the proverb should say, “An apple a day keeps the pharmacist away.”

Presenting at the Hand Surgery Specialty Day

Just presented: Pearls for Treating the Incarcerated- Can we Give Quality Care?

MotionSavvy Is A Tablet App That Understands Sign Language | TechCrunch

Adapted from TechCrunch

There are plenty of things to take for granted in this life, and the ability to communicate with
others is one of them. This may not be as easy of a task for the deaf. While they can communicate using sing language, the vast majority of people around them do not understands it or ‘speak’ it, making the deaf’s ability to communicate limited to the few who can.

With technology comes opportunity, though- MotionSavvy is building a tablet case that has the ability to translate American Sign Language into English and vice versa. The entire 6-person team is deaf.

The case has 3D motion recognition, which detects when a person is using ASL and converts it to text or voice. The software also has voice recognition through the tablet’s mic, which allows a hearing person to respond with voice to the person signing. It then converts their voice into text, which the hearing-impaired receiver can understand.

The current prototype only understands about 100 words. The team’s plan is to crowd-source the “massive” number of signs necessary to make this an effective tool. There are many thousands of signs in ASL alone, and various different “accents” or ways it is spoken.

Over 800 deaf people have signed up for the beta test, and hopes are that a consumer-ready product will hit the market in September 2015.

“This will give deaf people the power over their lives, the power to lead the lifestyle they want to have,” The team explain.

Women Getting Plastic Surgery On Hands For Engagement Selfies

There is a new trend going around in which women are getting plastic surgery on their hands in order to have better engagement pictures. This is getting popular with some older women who want to have younger looking hands to complement that diamond engagement ring.

Filler materials are used to either camouflage visible tendons or veins.

via CBS Connecticut

Banning the Handshake From the Health Care Setting?

The handshake represents a deeply established social custom. In recent years, however, there has been increasing recognition of the importance of hands as vectors for infection, leading to formal recommendations and policies regarding hand hygiene in hospitals and other health care facilities.1 Such programs have been limited by variable compliance and efficacy. In an attempt to avoid contracting or spreading infection, many individuals have made their own efforts to avoid shaking hands in various settings but, in doing so, may face social, political, and even financial risks.

Particularly in the current era of health care reform, innovative, practical, and fiscally prudent approaches toward the prevention of disease will assume increasingly important roles. Regulations to restrict the handshake from the health care setting, in conjunction with more robust hand hygiene programs, may help limit the spread of disease and thus could potentially decrease the clinical and economic burden associated with hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial resistance. Effective development and implementation of such a handshake ban will likely require further study to confirm and describe the link between handshakes and the transmission of pathogens and disease; the promotion of an alternative, health-conscious gesture to substitute for the handshake; and widespread media and educational programs.

via JAMA Network | JAMA | Banning the Handshake From the Health Care Setting.

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