News and Updates

WVU Medicine’s Dr. Shafic Sraj changing outlook for those with Dupuytren’s Disease

Featured on WVNews West Virginia

“MORGANTOWN — Folks suffering from Dupuytren’s contracture, or Dupuytren’s disease, once had a prognosis of complicated and invasive treatment options. But the work of Dr. Shafic Sraj at WVU Medicine is changing the outlook.

Dr Sraj has just completed a project on the disease, leading to more information about what people want to get out of their treatment and what they value the most. “We find that a lot of people actually have pain,” Sraj said. “Historically, we didn’t talk about this. This is something new.” A less invasive treatment is also something that Dr. Sraj and his WVU Medicine team are expert at. The surgeon just uses a tip of a needle that is inserted to “pop” the cord.

“I can take care of it immediately,” he said. “You’re done literally in seconds.

In-office orthopaedic hand procedure improves quality of life | WVU Medicine

 

From WVU Medicine Health Report: Dupuytren’s Disease

“Friday, June 19, 2020

It’s a common disorder that progressively pulls the fingers towards the palm, preventing full extension of the fingers. It’s called Dupuytren’s Disease and there is now a faster treatment for it. Shafic Sraj, MD, explains in this WVU Medicine Health Report.”

A new kind of Patient: eSports Gamers Emerge with Hand Problems

Adapted from AAOS Now.

Hand surgeons started seeing more gamers with overuse-type injuries. Little we know about this She realized she knew very little about the eSport industry, but at the article cited above, it is serious business and is here to stay. Similar to other repetitive and sometimes intense activities such as Fortnite competitions, gamers can and do develop overuse injuries including tendonitis. AAOS Now offers an insight of what goes in these competitions.

To slow an epidemic, focus on handwashing

Adapted from MdLinx

Improving the rates of hand-washing at airports could significantly reduce the spread of many infectious diseases such as the Flu and other viruses including the corona virus.

The study, which is based on epidemiological modeling and simulations, the team estimates that on average, only about 20% of people in airports have clean hands ( washed with soap and water, for at least 15 seconds, within the last hour), which leaves the other 80% are potentially contaminated. Improving that to 60% can slow global disease spread by almost 70%! The CDC and the WHO both indicate that hand hygiene is the most efficient and cost-effective way to control disease propagation. For any given disease outbreak, the authors said, identifying the closest 10 airports with the highest impact and focusing hand-washing education at them would be the most effective way of limiting the disease spread.

There is more to say about hands than hand surgery…

Here is the full reference: Hand‐Hygiene Mitigation Strategies Against Global Disease Spreading through the Air Transportation Network

Paying with your phone? It will soon be old fashion: It’s the age of the palm reader

Adapted from the Wall Street Journal


Amazon thinks paying with your palm may be the next cool thing. You won’t have to pull out your credit card nor your phone. Just scan your hand and you’re all set!

Featured in the WVU Dept of Orthopaedics Annual Report

You actually hear with… you Wrist?!

A New Device Lets You Feel Sound https://www.wsj.com/articles/hearing-loss-a-new-device-lets-you-feel-sound-11567691822

2019 WVSMA Healthcare Summit and Annual Meeting

WVU Medicine develops in-office surgery options

Dr. Shafic Sraj leads ‘Wide awake local anesthesia no-tourniquet’ surgery effort, which provides lower costs and more convenience to patients

Featured on wvnews.com

As featured on WVU News: “WALANT – Wide Awake Surgery at WVU Medicine”

From WVnews.com

If you need hand surgery such as carpal tunnel surgery or cyst removal, you don’t necessarily have to go to the hospital to have it done. There’s a newer way to do hand surgery — in the doctor’s office with local anesthesia. Mary Ravasio Minard explains WALANT — wide awake surgery.

Follow the link to watch it on Youtube

https://youtu.be/PVHgYWxS25g

Just Published: Nerve Conduction Studies in Surgical Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Patients

Background: Electrodiagnostic studies (EDX) serve a prominent role in the diagnostic workup of cubital tunnel syndrome (CBTS), but their reported sensitivity varies widely. The goals of our study were to determine the sensitivity of EDX in a cohort of patients who responded well to surgical cubital tunnel release (CBTR), and whether the implementation of the Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) criteria improves the sensitivity.

Methods: We identified 118 elbows with clinical CBTS who had preoperative EDX and underwent CBTR. The EDX diagnoses were CBTS, ulnar neuropathy (UN), and normal ulnar nerves. We divided the 118 elbows into those that received above-elbow stimulation (XE group) and those that did not (non-XE group). We calculated the sensitivities for all groups and reinterpreted the results according to the AANEM guidelines.

Results: Cubital tunnel release provided significant relief in 93.6% of the elbows. Based on the EDX reports, 11% patients had clear CBTS, 23% had UN, and 66% showed no UN. The sensitivities were 11.7% for CBTS and 34.2% for any UN. In the XE group, the sensitivity of the EDX reports for CBTS and UN climbed to 33.3% and 58.3%, respectively. When we calculated the across-elbow motor nerve conduction velocity, the sensitivity for CBTS and UN was 87.5% and 100%, respectively. The XE and non-XE groups showed no difference except for sex, bilaterality, concomitant carpal tunnel release, and obesity (P < .05).

Conclusion: Implementing AANEM guidelines results in significant improvement in correlation of clinical and electrodiagnostic findings of CBTS.

AAOS’s Innovation Theater a Huge Success

I am very pleased to share that our first-time Innovation Theater has been a huge success. I am proud to be a member of the AAOS Exhibits Committee and the chairperson for the Innovation Theater Sub-committee.

West Virginia State Medical Association Advocacy Day 2019

Advocating for Public Health and the Practice of Medicine at the WV State Capitol.

WV Senate President Mitch Carmichael and WVSMA members

At the AMA Interim Meeting 2018

Interview with WV Senator Stollings

At the ASSH Annual Meeting

Presenting my ” Nerve Conduction Studies in Surgical Cubital Tunnel Syndrome” at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Boston MA.

Avocado Hand

Avocado, the green-skinned, egg-shaped fruit, is getting more popular than ever. With it, there are increasing reports in media and medical news about avocado related  hand injuries .

 

Accidental knife injuries happen to fingers of the hand holding the avocado while peeling it. Such injuries has increased to the point that is they have been named ‘ Avocado hand’.

The hard shell covering a soft fruit allows the knife to slip through the flesh of the avocado and aim straight to ones fingers.  The best way to safely cut the avocado is not to hold it in your hand, but on a plate and aim the sharp edge of the knife away from your fingers. This can lead to serious injuries such as cut tendons, nerves, and blood vessels.

Ir Med J. The Avocado Hand. 2017 Dec 18;110(10):658.

Poster presentation at AAOS 2018

YPSgram Issue #1: On Costumer Service and the ‘Good Doctor”

WVSMA Young Physician Section

Earlier this month, I was proud to help publish the first issue of the YPSgram, the newsletter of the Young Physician Section of the West Virginia State Medical Association. Here is a link to the newsletter titled: On Customer Service and the ‘Good’ Doctor

 

Ribbon cutting at new WVU Medicine clinic in Fairmont

adapted from WVU Medicine CONNECTionsdsc_350420copy2

I am glad to share that WVU Medicine cut a ribbon at the new Fairmont facility on Sept. 22. A photo gallery from the ribbon-cutting ceremony is available on CONNECT.

The $13.9 million, 25,000-sq ft. outpatient center is located off Downtown Fairmont Exit 136 of I-79, near the Fairmont Gateway Connector.

I am pleased to be part of he Fairmont clinic team providing Hand, Elbow, shoulder orthopaedic care to the residents of Marion county and surrounding areas. new building and providers, a community open house is planned for Saturday, Oct. 21, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Watch for more details.

The image of the human hand encoded in DNA!

From the BBC

Researches chose the image of a human hand, representing the first form of human painting, to be the first DNA encoded image in a living form!
They inserted DNA sequences that represent the image into the genome of bacteria. Later, They decoded the sequences  into an image using a computer algorism with at least 90% accuracy.

The original DNA-coded image and the decoded image

WV Medical Journal Guest Editorial- July August 2017

http://digital.graphcompubs.com/publication/?m=30875&l=1#{“issue_id”:419834,”page”:20}

Gloves Through History

Adapted from: Fashion Times

Gloves played a substantial role in the conduct of human affairs and social interactions beyond keeping one’s hands warm and protected since ancient societies. Early Egyptian Pyramids contained hand covers without fingers. The tomb of Tutankhamen had the remains of decorated gloves.

Falconry, from De Arte Venandi cum Avibus, (On The Art of Hunting with Birds) , 1240 AC

Leather gloves were popular in the 1100s. Sturdy leather gloves were worn by laborers, falconers, and knights, whereas fashion gloves were crafted of fine leathers such as doeskin and lamb. Scented gloves were developed in the 1500s. Chicken skin gloves were worn at night to keep hands soft and white. Fabric gloves crafted from silk, satin, velvet, cotton, and linen were stylish in the 1500s.

 

Gloves had a variety of symbolic uses. The delivery of a glove to a monarch at an inauguration ceremony symbolized recognition of the new authority. Nobles received a glove when knighted.  Bishop status was granted by the delivery of a glove as well.  On the same token, Knights conveyed defiance or launched a challenge by casting down their war-gloves (gauntlet).

Gloves were used as messages of good will between sovereigns and dignitaries. They were sent to wish a person well, to congratulate them, or to console them. Gloves were also used for binding a bargain or as a bribe.

Gloves were a token of love.  They served a knight as an everlasting reminder of his love, inducing him to courage, loyalty and constancy while away. It also served as a charm against evil during conflict.

Today, gloves are practical articles that warm and protect our hands. People continue the tradition of wearing gloves at funerals, weddings, state functions, formal events, and the opera,  as gloves maintain their symbolic value and fashion statements.

Washing Your Hands

Adapted from BBC

Washing your hands- straightforward, or is it?

There’s plenty of evidence that washing one’s hands can reduce the spread of disease, only 5% of people wash their hands ‘properly’ ‘all the time’.

10% of 3000 people were witnessed leaving public toilets without washing their hands, and of those who did,33% didn’t use soap. While it is well established that we need to wash our hands properly, there are plenty of myths about what is proper.

Does the water need to be hot to get your hands clean?

In a survey of 500 adults, 69% believed that the temperature of the water has an impact on the effectiveness of hand-washing. Researchers found that water temperature made no statistically significant difference when other factors are controlled. Temperature still affects washing, though, because excessively cold or hot water lets people spend less time washing their hands than comfortable water temperature.

Is anti-bacterial hand wash better than soap?

A 2007 and a 2015 review both concluded that anti-bacterial hand washes  did not reduce the number of bacteria remaining on people’s hands after washing any more than soap did, nor was it any better than soap. Triclosan, a main ingredient on most antibacterial hand soaps, May increase anti-bacterial resistance and that and has been banned in the US and in the European Union.

Do you need to dry your hands afterwards?

Letting new hands air-dry is fine as long as he did not contaminated hands before they try out. Durkan’s transfer to your hands more easily if they’re wet.

Hand dryer or hand towel?

There’s a lot of debate surrounding this one. Most of us don’t want for as long as 45 minutes needed for the hands to dry using hand dry. New were hand dryers take 10 seconds hand and our equivalent to paper towels.

Making toilets nicer also makes a difference. One study observe 3,000 people in the US, found that if the toilets were clean and well-kept, people were more likely to stop and wash their hands properly. When the sinks were dirty, they just wanted to get out of there.

Whichever way you choose to wash and dry your hands, do it for longer than you think.

At the AAOS Clinical Practice Guideline Workgroup for Rotator Cuff 

I am happy to be part of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ CPG for the Rotator Cuff.

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